This fall in Ontario, our schoolchildren will enter cleaner, greener and more sustainable schools (126 schools) which, by that time, will be powered by cleaner and renewable sources of energy, like solar, wind and geothermal.

Our children will enjoy a healthier learning environment because using renewable energy will help schools reduce their greenhouse gas emissions.

Also, Ontario and the schools will save money on energy costs or earn revenue by selling electricity back to the grid.

Happily, schools and boards will reinvest savings and revenue to support improved student achievement and success.

Even the students will  see first-hand the green values of cleaner and renewable sources of energy through these power projects.

Here are the financial stats behind these clean energy projects:

  • In 2009-10, Ontario school boards spent nearly $400 million on utility bills.
  • Since 2009, Ontario has invested more than $620 million to make Ontario’s schools cleaner, more sustainable places to learn.
  • As a result, more than 2,400 schools have benefited from more than 4,200 clean energy projects.
  • From that investment, $50 million went toward solar, wind and geothermal technologies as a part of the Renewable Energy Funding for Schools program.
  • Ontario’s Long-Term Energy Plan includes increasing the province’s renewable power supply from sources like wind, solar and bio-energy by more than 500 per cent, up to 10,700 megawatts.
  • Ontario now has more than 1,500 megawatts of wind power online generated by more than 800 wind turbines. In 2003, there were only 15 megawatts of wind power generated by 10 turbines. This is a 100-fold increase in wind power capacity.

Please click here to find out more about capital investments in Ontario’s schools.

Clean Energy Transformation of Ontario Schools This Fall

Ontario, Canada: Newsroom

News Release

Renewable Energy Coming To Ontario Schools

April 21, 2011

McGuinty Government Supporting Clean Schools, Building Clean Energy Economy

This fall, 126 schools will be turning on more cleaner and renewable sources of power, like solar, wind and geothermal, creating cleaner and more sustainable places to learn for Ontario students.

Using renewable energy will help schools reduce their greenhouse gas emissions, save money on energy costs or earn revenue by selling electricity back to the grid.  Schools and boards will reinvest savings and revenue to support improved student achievement and success.

Investing in our schools is an important part of the McGuinty government’s Open Ontario plan to strengthen and protect public education.

QUOTES

“These projects are giving students an opportunity to see first-hand the benefits of turning on clean, modern and reliable power. They provide a clear demonstration of how Ontario can harness renewable sources of power for a cleaner and more prosperous future.”

Leona Dombrowksy
Minister of Education

“This is an important investment in Ontario’s clean energy economy and in our schools. It helps build the growing renewable energy sector and modernize our electricity system while giving school boards an opportunity to cut energy costs.”

– Brad Duguid
Minister of Energy


QUICK FACTS

  • In 2009-10, Ontario school boards spent nearly $400 million on utility bills.
  • Since 2009, the McGuinty government has invested more than $620 million to make Ontario’s schools cleaner, more sustainable places to learn. As a result, more than 2,400 schools have benefited from more than 4,200 clean energy projects.
  • From that investment, $50 million went toward solar, wind and geothermal technologies as a part of the Renewable Energy Funding for Schools program.
  • Solar panels and wind turbines can sell electricity back to the grid through the MicroFIT Program, an important part of the Green Energy Act.
  • Ontario’s Long-Term Energy Plan includes increasing the province’s renewable power supply from sources like wind, solar and bio-energy by more than 500 per cent, up to 10,700 megawatts.
  • Ontario now has more than 1,500 megawatts of wind power online generated by more than 800 wind turbines. In 2003, there were only 15 megawatts of wind power generated by 10 turbines. This is a 100-fold increase in wind power capacity.

CONTACT

  • Mike Feenstra
    Minister’s Office
    416-325-9216
    mike.feenstra@ontario.ca

Ministry of Education
ontario.ca/education

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