Ontario’s Zero BAC (Blood Alcohol Concentration) for Drivers of Ages 21 and Under
The following video discusses these concerns for drivers 21 and under as well as all novice drivers:

  • As of August 1, 2010, if you are a fully licensed driver who is 21 and under or a novice driver and are caught with any alcohol in your blood, you will receive an immediate24-hour roadside driver licence suspension
    • and, if convicted, you will face a fine of $60-$500 and a 30-day licence suspension.
  • Novice drivers of all ages in the Graduated Licensing System (GLS) must also maintain a zero BAC (Blood Alcohol Concentration) while driving.
  • As of August 1, 2010, if you are a novice driver and are caught with any amount of alcohol in your blood, you will receive an immediate 24-hour roadside driver licence suspension
    • and if convicted, will face a fine of $60-$500 and will receive a suspension period as per the Novice Driver Escalating Sanction scheme, up to and including cancellation of the novice licence.
  • You will also have to return to the start of GLS (Graduated Licensing System).

Please drive sober during this festive season of merry-making.

If you drink, plan ahead for a safe ride home by:

  • taking public transit,
  • calling a cab,
  • riding with a designated driver or
  • staying overnight.

Did you know that:

  • if you are driving with a blood alcohol concentration of 0.05 to 0.08, you are driving in the “warn range”
    • if caught, your license will be immediately suspended for three days for a first occurrence
    • since 2009, there have been more than 40,000 “warn range” licence suspensions issued in Ontario
  • small amounts of alcohol, some prescription medications and illegal drugs can impair judgement
  • about one-quarter of all fatalities on Ontario roads are alcohol-related
  • Ontario has introduced some of the toughest impaired driving lawsin Canada
    • each year, about 17,000 people lose their license for 90 days for driving with a blood alcohol limit over 0.08 or for failing or refusing alcohol or drug testing – that’s about two people every hour
    • Ontario’s impaired driving offence rate is 60 per cent lower than the rest of Canada

If you are hosting a holiday party, please click here to plan a safe ride home for your guests by following some home hosting tips.

In some communities across Ontario, you can get a ride home via Operation Red Nose: please click here for more info.

Enjoy a Safe and Sober Holiday Season!

Have a Safe & Sober Holiday Season: Plan Ahead for a Safe Ride Home in Ontario, Canada

Have a Safe & Sober Holiday Season: Plan Ahead for a Safe Ride Home in Ontario, Canada

Ontario, Canada: Newsroom

News Release

Make This Holiday Season A Safe One

December 22, 2011

McGuinty Government Reminds Ontarians To Always Drive Sober

This holiday season make sure you plan ahead for a safe ride home – take public transit, call a cab, ride with a designated driver or stay overnight.

About one-quarter of all fatalities on Ontario roads are alcohol-related.  That’s why to help keep Ontario families safe, the province has introduced some of the toughest impaired driving laws in Canada.

Even if your blood alcohol concentration is less than 0.05, you can still be impaired. Small amounts of alcohol, some prescription medications and illegal drugs can impair judgement.

Having a safe way to get home after a festive night out means you never have to get behind the wheel impaired – putting yourself and others at risk.

QUOTES

“Ontario’s tough laws, enforcement and public education on impaired driving are keeping families safe. We can all do our part to help eliminate impaired driving by making sure our family and friends know there’s no excuse for driving impaired. Plan for a safe holiday season by planning for a safe ride home.”

– Bob Chiarelli
Minister of Transportation, Minister of Infrastructure

“MADD Canada, Mothers Against Drunk Driving, encourages drivers to celebrate the holiday season in a safe and sober way. Help prevent needless deaths and injuries by planning ahead: use a designated driver, take a taxi or public transit, call a friend or relative, or arrange to stay overnight”

 – Marlene Stephens
President, MADD Toronto

QUICK FACTS

  • If you are driving with a blood alcohol concentration of 0.05 to 0.08, you are driving in the “warn range.” If caught, your license will be immediately suspended for three days for a first occurrence.
  • Since the legislation was enacted in May 2009, there have been more than 40,000 “warn range” licence suspensions issued in Ontario.
  • Each year, about 17,000 people lose their license for 90 days for driving with a blood alcohol limit over 0.08 or for failing or refusing alcohol or drug testing – that’s about two people every hour.
  • According to Statistics Canada, Ontario’s impaired driving offence rate is 60 per cent lower than the rest of Canada.

CONTACT

  • David J. Salter
    Minister’s Office
    416-327-1855

Ministry of Transportation
ontario.ca/transportation

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