Categories
Community Health & Wellness

Mandatory Labelling of Mechanically Tenderized Beef to Help Improve Food Safety for Canadians

This video presents “New health and safety labels on beef to prevent bacterial food poisoning.”

  • “Mechanically tenderized beef now ID’d with sticker indicating cooking temp of 63 C.”

Mechanically Tenderized Beef (MTB): Greater Risk of E. coli O157 Bacteria Contamination from MTB Products When Compared to Intact Cuts of Beef

Here is Health Canada’s explanation.

In 2012, 18 cases of foodborne illness caused by Escherichia coli O157 (E. coli O157) were reported as part of a Canadian outbreak associated with contaminated beef.

  • During the food safety investigation following the outbreak, five cases were considered to be likely associated with the consumption of beef that had been mechanically tenderized at the retail level.

Mechanical tenderization of meat is a practice that has been used by processors, food services and retailers for many years to improve the tenderness and flavour of beef.

  • The process of mechanically tenderizing meat involves using instruments such as needles or blades to break-down, penetrate or pierce its surface disrupting the muscle fibers, or injecting it with a marinade or tenderizing solution.
  • It is not necessarily apparent by just looking at a mechanically tenderized meat product that it has undergone this process.

In general, the internal temperature of a steak or other solid cut of beef is not a significant concern given that any harmful bacteria that may be present would normally be on the surface of the meat and would be inactivated during cooking.

  • However, when steaks and beef cuts are mechanically tenderized, there is a potential for bacteria to be transferred from the surface to the centre of the meat.
  • Therefore, there may be an increased risk to consumers from MTB.

In May 2013, Health Canada completed a health risk assessment specifically focused on E. coli O157 in MTB (Catford et al., 2013).

  • The results of the assessment showed a five-fold increase in risk from MTB products when compared to intactFootnote 1 cuts of beef.
  • The assessment also noted that without labels, it is difficult for Canadians to identify which beef products have been mechanically tenderized.

Health Minister Rona Ambrose recently announced the following new labelling requirements for mechanically tenderized beef (MTB) to help consumers know when they are buying MTB products and how to cook them:

  • All MTB products sold in Canada must be clearly labelled as “mechanically tenderized,” and include instructions for safe cooking.
  • The new labels will emphasize the importance of cooking MTB to a minimum internal temperature of 63°C (145°F) and turning over mechanically tenderized steaks at least twice during cooking to kill harmful bacteria that can cause food poisoning.

The examples shown below demonstrate the requirements as set out in the Food and Drugs Regulations (B.14.022).

  • This is not meant to be an exhaustive list of all acceptable scenarios.
  • Please note that all other labelling requirements that apply to any meat product sold in Canada still apply.
Figure 1. Prepackaged MTB steak with a separate label that contains all MTB labelling requirements  This figure outlines an example of how to comply with the mandatory labelling requirements for selling mechanically tenderized beef in Canada. The image is of a prepackaged mechanically tenderized beef steak, as found in a grocery store. There is a larger white label containing mandatory labelling information for meat, and a smaller, separate yellow label that identifies the steak as being mechanically tenderized and provides recommended cooking instructions, including specific cooking instructions for steak. All label information is displayed in English and French. Image by Health Canada.
Figure 1. Prepackaged MTB steak with a separate label that contains all MTB labelling requirements This figure outlines an example of how to comply with the mandatory labelling requirements for selling mechanically tenderized beef in Canada. The image is of a prepackaged mechanically tenderized beef steak, as found in a grocery store. There is a larger white label containing mandatory labelling information for meat, and a smaller, separate yellow label that identifies the steak as being mechanically tenderized and provides recommended cooking instructions, including specific cooking instructions for steak. All label information is displayed in English and French. Image by Health Canada.
Figure 2. Prepackaged MTB roast with all MTB labelling requirements included on the same label as other mandatory information.  This figure outlines an example of how to comply with the mandatory labelling requirements for selling mechanically tenderized beef in Canada. The image is of a prepackaged mechanically tenderized beef oven roast, as found in a grocery store. There is one large white label containing the mandatory labelling information for meat, as well as the new mandatory labelling requirements that identifies the steak as being mechanically tenderized and provides recommended cooking instructions. All label information is displayed in English and French. Image by Health Canada.
Figure 2. Prepackaged MTB roast with all MTB labelling requirements included on the same label as other mandatory information. This figure outlines an example of how to comply with the mandatory labelling requirements for selling mechanically tenderized beef in Canada. The image is of a prepackaged mechanically tenderized beef oven roast, as found in a grocery store. There is one large white label containing the mandatory labelling information for meat, as well as the new mandatory labelling requirements that identifies the steak as being mechanically tenderized and provides recommended cooking instructions. All label information is displayed in English and French. Image by Health Canada.
Figure 3a. Non-prepackaged MTB steak that is on display at meat counter with an in-store sign indicating "mechanically tenderized".  This figure outlines an example of how to comply with the mandatory labelling requirements for selling mechanically tenderized beef in Canada. The image is of non-prepackaged mechanically tenderized beef steak on display, as found at a butcher counter.  There is a small sign which is inserted into the meat which indicates the common name and price of the meat, as well as another small sign that identifies the steak as being mechanically tenderized. All label information is displayed in English and French. Image by Health Canada.
Figure 3a. Non-prepackaged MTB steak that is on display at meat counter with an in-store sign indicating “mechanically tenderized”. This figure outlines an example of how to comply with the mandatory labelling requirements for selling mechanically tenderized beef in Canada. The image is of non-prepackaged mechanically tenderized beef steak on display, as found at a butcher counter. There is a small sign which is inserted into the meat which indicates the common name and price of the meat, as well as another small sign that identifies the steak as being mechanically tenderized. All label information is displayed in English and French. Image by Health Canada.
Figure 3b. Non-prepackaged MTB product that has been subsequently packaged labelled with the MTB labelling requirements.  This figure outlines an example of how to comply with the mandatory labelling requirements for selling mechanically tenderized beef in Canada. The image is of a non-prepackaged mechanically tenderized beef steak that has been wrapped in paper as purchased and received from a butcher counter.  There is a sticker label on the outside of the package of meat that identifies the steak as being mechanically tenderized and provides recommended cooking instructions, including specific cooking instructions for steak. All label information is displayed in English and French. Image by Health Canada.
Figure 3b. Non-prepackaged MTB product that has been subsequently packaged labelled with the MTB labelling requirements. This figure outlines an example of how to comply with the mandatory labelling requirements for selling mechanically tenderized beef in Canada. The image is of a non-prepackaged mechanically tenderized beef steak that has been wrapped in paper as purchased and received from a butcher counter. There is a sticker label on the outside of the package of meat that identifies the steak as being mechanically tenderized and provides recommended cooking instructions, including specific cooking instructions for steak. All label information is displayed in English and French. Image by Health Canada.

Please note that the regulation only applies to mechanically tenderized beef, including veal, and no other species of meat.

  • It does not apply to ground beef or any uncooked beef that has been subject to a comminution process such as grinding, chopping, flaking, mincing, fine texturing and/or mechanical separation.

Contact Info:

Michael Bolkenius
Office of the Honourable Rona Ambrose
Federal Minister of Health
613-957-0200

Public Inquiries:
613-957-2991
1-866 225-0709

NEWS RELEASE

Government of Canada Announces Mandatory Labelling of Mechanically Tenderized Beef

New labels will help improve food safety for Canadians

August 21, 2014 – Ottawa, ON – Health Canada

Today, Health Minister Rona Ambrose announced new labelling requirements for mechanically tenderized beef (MTB) to help consumers know when they are buying MTB products and how to cook them.

Starting today, all MTB products sold in Canada must be clearly labelled as “mechanically tenderized,” and include instructions for safe cooking. The new labels will emphasize the importance of cooking MTB to a minimum internal temperature of 63°C (145°F) and turning over mechanically tenderized steaks at least twice during cooking to kill harmful bacteria that can cause food poisoning. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) will be verifying that labels meet the new requirements.

This change is an example of how the Government is promoting healthy and safe food choices to consumers and preventing food safety risks as promised under the Healthy and Safe Food for Canadians Framework.

As part of its commitment to promoting food safety, Health Canada also recently released new industry guidelines to improve safe cooking and handling information on packaged raw ground meat and raw ground poultry products sold in Canada. To be used by retailers, processors and importers who choose to include food safety information on their products, the guidelines provide standards on what information and symbols to include on the label to boost consumer recognition and uptake, and how the label should be formatted and placed on ground meat packages so that it can be easily seen by consumers.

Quick Facts on new labelling requirements for MTB

  • Mechanical tenderization of meat is a common practice used by the food industry to improve the tenderness and flavour of beef by using needles or blades to break down muscle fibres.
  • This regulatory change applies to all industry sectors selling uncooked MTB to other industry members or consumers. This includes, but is not limited to, grocery retailers, butcher shops, meat processors, and importers of MTB.
  • Federally registered plants that produce mechanically tenderized beef cuts, such as steaks or roasts, have been required to label those products as tenderized and with cooking instructions since July 2013.

Quotes

“Without clear labels, it is difficult for consumers to know which beef products have been mechanically tenderized. Today’s announcement, along with new industry labelling guidelines we have released, will help Canadians know when they are buying these products and how to cook them. This regulatory change is another step in our government’s commitment to make certain that consumers have the food safety information they need.”
Rona Ambrose
Minister of Health

Associated Links

Michael Bolkenius
Office of the Honourable Rona Ambrose
Federal Minister of Health
613-957-0200

Public Inquiries:
613-957-2991
1-866 225-0709


Boeuf attendri mécaniquement (BAM) ont un risque plus élevé de bactéries E. coli O157 contamination de BAM produits comparativement à coupes intactes de boeuf.

Voici l’explication de Santé Canada.

En 2012, 18 cas de maladie d’origine alimentaire provoquée par Escherichia coli O157 (E. coli O157) ont été signalés dans le cadre d’une éclosion causée par du bœuf contaminé au Canada.

  • Au cours de l’enquête sur la salubrité alimentaire qui a suivi cette éclosion, il a été déterminé que cinq des dix-huit cas seraient possiblement associés à la consommation de bœuf ayant été attendri mécaniquement (BAM) chez des détaillants.

Le processus d’attendrissage mécanique de la viande est une pratique utilisée par les transformateurs, les établissements de restauration ainsi que les détaillants depuis de nombreuses années dans le but d’améliorer la tendreté de la viande de bœuf et d’en rehausser le goût.

  • Ce processus nécessite l’usage d’instruments, comme des aiguilles ou des lames, pour inciser la viande, en percer la surface, ce qui a pour effet de briser les fibres musculaires, ou y injecter une marinade ou une solution d’attendrissage.
  • Regarder à l’œil nu un produit de bœuf attendri mécaniquement ne permet pas nécessairement de savoir s’il a été soumis à ce processus. L’attendrissage mécanique peut également être réalisé à la maison puisque les consommateurs canadiens peuvent se procurer des outils conçus à cette fin.

En règle générale, la température interne d’un bifteck ou d’autres pièces de bœuf coupées solides n’est pas une préoccupation très importante, puisque les bactéries nocives qui y sont possiblement présentes ne devraient se trouver qu’à la surface de la viande, ce qui signifie qu’elles seraient inactivées pendant la cuisson.

  • Toutefois, lorsque les biftecks et les pièces de bœuf sont attendris mécaniquement, il est possible que les bactéries soient transférées depuis leur surface, jusqu’en leur centre.
  • Par conséquent, les consommateurs pourraient courir un plus grand risque.

En mai 2013, Santé Canada a terminé une évaluation des risques pour la santé portant particulièrement sur E. coli O157 dans le BAM (Catford et coll., 2013).

  • Les résultats de l’évaluation des risques pour la santé ont révélé que les produits de BAM présentent cinq fois plus de risques que ceux attribués aux pièces de bœuf intactesNote de bas de page 1.
  • L’évaluation soulignait également le fait qu’en l’absence d’étiquetage, la population canadienne ne dispose d’aucun moyen de savoir lesquels parmi les produits de bœuf ont été attendris mécaniquement.

Ministre de la Santé, Rona Ambrose, a récemment annoncé de nouvelles exigences d’étiquetage du bœuf attendri mécaniquement pour aider les consommateurs à savoir quand ils achètent des produits de bœuf attendri mécaniquement et comment les cuire.

  • Tous les produits de bœuf attendri mécaniquement vendus au Canada doivent clairement afficher la mention que la viande est « attendrie mécaniquement » et inclure des directives de cuisson salubre.
  • Les nouvelles étiquettes mettront l’accent sur l’importance de faire cuire le bœuf attendri mécaniquement jusqu’à ce qu’il atteigne une température interne d’au moins 63 °C (145 °F) et de retourner les steaks attendris mécaniquement au moins deux fois pendant la cuisson pour tuer les bactéries nocives pouvant causer des intoxications alimentaires.

Les exemples présentés ci-dessous font état des exigences telles qu’elles ont été établies dans le Règlement sur les aliments et drogues (B.14.022).

  • Cette liste ne comprend pas tous les scénarios possibles (c.-à-d., elle n’est pas exhaustive).
  • Il convient de noter que toutes les autres exigences d’étiquetage qui s’appliquent à tout autre produit de viande vendu au Canada s’y appliquent toujours.
Cette figure présente un exemple de la façon de se conformer aux exigences en matière d'étiquetage pour la vente  de bœuf attendri mécaniquement au Canada. L'image représente un bifteck de boeuf attendri mécaniquement préemballé, tel que retrouvé dans une épicerie. Il y a une grande étiquette blanche contenant des renseignements relatifs à  l'étiquetage obligatoire de la viande, et séparément, une plus petite étiquette jaune  qui identifie le bifteck comme étant attendri mécaniquement  et fournit des instructions de cuisson recommandées, y compris les instructions de cuisson spécifiques pour le bifteck. Tous les renseignements contenus sur l'étiquette sont affichés en anglais et en français. Image par Santé Canada.
Figure 1. Bifteck de BAM préemballé sur lequel est apposée une étiquette distincte conforme à toutes les exigences d’étiquetage à l’égard du BAM. Cette figure présente un exemple de la façon de se conformer aux exigences en matière d’étiquetage pour la vente de bœuf attendri mécaniquement au Canada. L’image représente un bifteck de boeuf attendri mécaniquement préemballé, tel que retrouvé dans une épicerie. Il y a une grande étiquette blanche contenant des renseignements relatifs à l’étiquetage obligatoire de la viande, et séparément, une plus petite étiquette jaune qui identifie le bifteck comme étant attendri mécaniquement et fournit des instructions de cuisson recommandées, y compris les instructions de cuisson spécifiques pour le bifteck. Tous les renseignements contenus sur l’étiquette sont affichés en anglais et en français. Image par Santé Canada.
Cette figure présente un exemple de la façon de se conformer aux exigences en matière d'étiquetage pour la vente  de bœuf attendri mécaniquement au Canada. L'image représente  un rôti de boeuf  attendri mécaniquement préemballé , tel que retrouvé dans une épicerie. Il y a une grande étiquette blanche contenant des renseignements relatifs à  l'étiquetage obligatoire de la viande ainsi que les nouvelles exigences obligatoires en matière d'étiquetage qui identifie le bifteck  comme étant attendri mécaniquement  et fournit des instructions de cuisson recommandées. Tous les renseignements contenus   sur l'étiquette sont  affichés en anglais et en français. Image par Santé Canada.
Figure 2. Rôti de BAM préemballé sur lequel est apposée une étiquette où toutes les exigences d’étiquetage à l’égard du BAM ont été intégrées en plus des autres renseignements obligatoires. Cette figure présente un exemple de la façon de se conformer aux exigences en matière d’étiquetage pour la vente de bœuf attendri mécaniquement au Canada. L’image représente un rôti de boeuf attendri mécaniquement préemballé , tel que retrouvé dans une épicerie. Il y a une grande étiquette blanche contenant des renseignements relatifs à l’étiquetage obligatoire de la viande ainsi que les nouvelles exigences obligatoires en matière d’étiquetage qui identifie le bifteck comme étant attendri mécaniquement et fournit des instructions de cuisson recommandées. Tous les renseignements contenus sur l’étiquette sont affichés en anglais et en français. Image par Santé Canada.
Cette figure présente un exemple de la façon de se conformer aux exigences en matière d'étiquetage pour la vente de bœuf attendri mécaniquement au Canada. L'image représente un bifteck  de boeuf attendri mécaniquement  non préemballé présenté dans un comptoir de viandes , tel que  retrouvé  dans un comptoir de boucher. Il y a un petit écriteau  qui est inséré dans la viande et qui indique le nom commun et le prix de la viande, ainsi qu'un autre petit écriteau  qui identifie le bifteck comme étant attendri mécaniquement . Tous les renseignements  contenus sur l'étiquette sont  affichés en anglais et en français. Image par Santé Canada.
Figure 3a. Bifteck de BAM non préemballé présenté dans un comptoir de viandes sur lequel est apposée l’étiquette du magasin portant la mention « attendri mécaniquement ». Cette figure présente un exemple de la façon de se conformer aux exigences en matière d’étiquetage pour la vente de bœuf attendri mécaniquement au Canada. L’image représente un bifteck de boeuf attendri mécaniquement non préemballé présenté dans un comptoir de viandes , tel que retrouvé dans un comptoir de boucher. Il y a un petit écriteau qui est inséré dans la viande et qui indique le nom commun et le prix de la viande, ainsi qu’un autre petit écriteau qui identifie le bifteck comme étant attendri mécaniquement . Tous les renseignements contenus sur l’étiquette sont affichés en anglais et en français. Image par Santé Canada.
Cette figure présente un exemple de la façon de se conformer aux exigences en matière d'étiquetage pour la vente  de bœuf attendri mécaniquement au Canada. L'image représente un bifteck de boeuf attendri mécaniquement non préemballé qui a été ultérieurement enveloppé dans du papier tel  qu'acheté et reçu d'un comptoir de boucherie. Il y a une étiquette autocollante apposée à l'extérieur de l'emballage de la viande qui identifie le bifteck  comme étant attendri mécaniquement  et fournit des instructions de cuisson recommandées, y compris les instructions de cuisson spécifiques pour le bifteck . Tous les renseignements  contenus sur  l'étiquette sont  affichés en anglais et en français. Image par Santé Canada.
Figure 3b. Produit de BAM non préemballé qui a été ultérieurement emballé et sur lequel a été apposée une étiquette conforme à toutes les exigences d’étiquetage à l’égard du BAM. Cette figure présente un exemple de la façon de se conformer aux exigences en matière d’étiquetage pour la vente de bœuf attendri mécaniquement au Canada. L’image représente un bifteck de boeuf attendri mécaniquement non préemballé qui a été ultérieurement enveloppé dans du papier tel qu’acheté et reçu d’un comptoir de boucherie. Il y a une étiquette autocollante apposée à l’extérieur de l’emballage de la viande qui identifie le bifteck comme étant attendri mécaniquement et fournit des instructions de cuisson recommandées, y compris les instructions de cuisson spécifiques pour le bifteck . Tous les renseignements contenus sur l’étiquette sont affichés en anglais et en français. Image par Santé Canada.

S’il vous plaît noter que le règlement ne s’applique qu’au bœuf attendri mécaniquement, y compris le veau, et à aucun autre type de viande (c.-à-d., espèce animale).

  • Il ne s’applique pas au bœuf haché ni à toute autre viande de bœuf crue soumise à un processus de fragmentation, qu’elle ait été hachée, broyée, réduite en flocons ou en fines particules, émincée et/ou séparée mécaniquement, par exemple.

Contactez-Les:

Michael Bolkenius
Cabinet de l’honorable Rona Ambrose
Ministre fédérale de la Santé
613-957-0200

Renseignements au public
613-957-2991
1-866-225-0709

Communiqué de presse

Le gouvernement du Canada annonce l’étiquetage obligatoire du boeuf attendri mécaniquement

De nouvelles étiquettes contribueront à améliorer la salubrité des aliments des Canadiens

21 août 2014 – Ottawa (Ontario) – Santé Canada

Aujourd’hui, la ministre de la Santé Rona Ambrose a annoncé de nouvelles exigences d’étiquetage du bœuf attendri mécaniquement pour aider les consommateurs à savoir quand ils achètent des produits de bœuf attendri mécaniquement et comment les cuire.

À partir de maintenant, tous les produits de bœuf attendri mécaniquement vendus au Canada doivent clairement afficher la mention que la viande est « attendrie mécaniquement » et inclure des directives de cuisson salubre. Les nouvelles étiquettes mettront l’accent sur l’importance de faire cuire le bœuf attendri mécaniquement jusqu’à ce qu’il atteigne une température interne d’au moins 63 °C (145 °F) et de retourner les steaks attendris mécaniquement au moins deux fois pendant la cuisson pour tuer les bactéries nocives pouvant causer des intoxications alimentaires. L’Agence canadienne d’inspection des aliments (ACIA) vérifiera que les étiquettes respectent les nouvelles exigences.

Cette modification est un exemple de la façon dont le gouvernement fait la promotion de choix alimentaires sains et salubres auprès des consommateurs et prévient les risques pour la salubrité alimentaire, comme promis dans le cadre d’application Aliments sains et salubres pour les Canadiens.

Dans le cadre de son engagement à favoriser la salubrité des aliments, Santé Canada a aussi récemment fait paraître de nouvelles lignes directrices pour l’industrie en vue d’améliorer l’information relative à la cuisson et à la manipulation sécuritaire des produits de viande et de volaille hachés emballés à l’état cru qui sont vendus au Canada. Ces lignes directrices, destinées aux détaillants, aux transformateurs et aux importateurs qui choisissent d’inclure de l’information relative à la salubrité des aliments sur leurs produits, fixent des normes régissant les renseignements et les symboles à inclure sur l’étiquette afin d’accroître la reconnaissance par les consommateurs et leur intérêt, en plus de régir la présentation de l’étiquette et la façon dont elle est disposée sur les emballages de viande hachée pour que les consommateurs puissent la voir facilement.

Faits en bref sur les exigences d’étiquetage du bœuf attendri mécaniquement

  • L’attendrissement mécanique de la viande est une pratique commune utilisée par l’industrie alimentaire pour améliorer la tendreté et la saveur du bœuf en brisant les fibres musculaires au moyen d’aiguilles ou de lames.
  • Cette modification réglementaire s’applique à tous les secteurs de l’industrie qui vendent du bœuf attendri mécaniquement à l’état cru à d’autres membres de l’industrie ou aux consommateurs. Ceux-ci comprennent, sans s’y limiter, les épiceries, les boucheries, les transformateurs de viande et les importateurs de bœuf attendri mécaniquement.
  • Les établissements agréés par le gouvernement fédéral qui produisent des coupes de bœuf attendries mécaniquement, comme des steaks et des rôtis, ont l’obligation depuis juillet 2013 d’indiquer sur l’étiquette qu’il s’agit de produits attendris et d’y inclure des directives de cuisson.

Citations

« Sans étiquettes claires, il est difficile pour les consommateurs de savoir quels produits de bœuf ont été attendris mécaniquement. L’annonce d’aujourd’hui, de concert avec les nouvelles lignes directrices d’étiquetage pour l’industrie que nous avons fait paraître, aidera les Canadiens à savoir quand ils achètent ces produits et comment les faire cuire. Cette modification réglementaire est une autre mesure prise par notre gouvernement dans le cadre de son engagement de veiller à ce que les consommateurs aient l’information sur la salubrité des aliments dont ils ont besoin. »
Rona Ambrose
Ministre de la Santé

Liens associés

Michael Bolkenius
Cabinet de l’honorable Rona Ambrose
Ministre fédérale de la Santé
613-957-0200

Renseignements au public
613-957-2991
1-866-225-0709

______________________________________

You may also want to know:

1 reply on “Mandatory Labelling of Mechanically Tenderized Beef to Help Improve Food Safety for Canadians”

I am genuinely thankful to the owner of this web site who has shared this fantastic article at at this time.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.