The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is recalling Compliments brand Scrumptious Seafood Pie recalled due to pieces of plastic.

  • CFIA Reference number: 9556.

Please click here for the description of the affected product.

The other details of this recall are as follows. Read more of Health Hazard Alert: Compliments Brand Scrumptious Seafood Pie is Recalled

The following video presents The State of Homelessness in Canada, 2013:

The State of Homelessness in Canada: 2013 is the first extensive Canadian report card on homelessness. This report examines what we know about homelessness, the historical, social and economic context in which it has emerged, demographic features of the problem, and potential solutions. The State of Homelessness provides a starting point to inform the development of a consistent, evidence-based approach towards ending homelessness.

Our goal in developing this report was to both assess the breadth of the problem and to develop a methodology for national measurement. We believe that homelessness is not a given and that not just reducing, but ending, the crisis is achievable.

The information for the State of Homelessness in Canada report has been compiled by the Canadian Homelessness Research Network (Homeless Hub) and the Canadian Alliance to End Homelessness from the best available research to date. Because we lack strong data on homelessness in Canada, our estimates of the scale of the problem are just that: an estimate, but they represent an important starting point. As the first national report card on homelessness, the evaluation of the response to homelessness by Canada’s homeless sector provides an important means of benchmarking progress toward ending homelessness.

For more on this, see: homelesshub.ca/sohc13

The Canadian Homelessness Research Network, led by York University, created the Canadian Definition of Homelessness as follows.

The definition includes, but is not limited to, the following:

Homelessness describes the situation of an individual or family without stable, permanent, appropriate housing, or the immediate prospect, means and ability of acquiring it. It is the result of systemic or societal barriers, a lack of affordable and appropriate housing, the individual/household’s financial, mental, cognitive, behavioural or physical challenges, and/or racism and discrimination. Most people do not choose to be homeless, and the experience is generally negative, unpleasant, stressful and distressing.

Homelessness describes a range of housing and shelter circumstances, with people being without any shelter at one end, and being insecurely housed at the other. That is, homelessness encompasses a range of physical living situations, organized here in a typology that includes 1) Unsheltered, or absolutely homeless and living on the streets or in places not intended for human habitation; 2) Emergency Sheltered, including those staying in overnight shelters for people who are homeless, as well as shelters for those impacted by family violence; 3) Provisionally Accommodated, referring to those whose accommodation is temporary or lacks security of tenure, and finally, 4) At Risk of Homelessness, referring to people who are not homeless, but whose current economic and/or housing situation is precarious or does not meet public health and safety standards. It should be noted that for many people homelessness is not a static state but rather a fluid experience, where one’s shelter circumstances and options may shift and change quite dramatically and with frequency.

The problem of homelessness and housing exclusion refers to the failure of society to ensure that adequate systems, funding and support are in place so that all people, even in crisis situations, have access to housing. The goal of ending homelessness is to ensure housing stability, which means people have a fixed address and housing that is appropriate (affordable, safe, adequately maintained, accessible and suitable in size), and includes required services as needed (supportive), in addition to income and supports.

Canadian Observatory on Homelessness (2012) Canadian Definition of Homelessness.
Homeless Hub: www.homelesshub.ca/homelessdefinition/  (pdf)

Here is another definition of Canadian homelessnes.

Homelessness is an extreme form of poverty and social exclusion. Simply put, people who are homeless do not have safe, affordable, appropriate, permanent housing to which they can return whenever they choose. This includes people who are absolutely homeless and are living on the streets or in shelters, the ‘hidden homeless’ who are staying with friends, relatives or in institutional settings, and those ‘at risk’ of homelessness, whose current economic and housing situation is precarious.

Homelessness can result from a combination of individual and structural factors. Individual factors that can contribute to homelessness include: deep poverty, mental or physical illness, addiction, trauma, abuse, lack of education and a lack of supportive relationships.

Structural causes of homelessness are social and economic in nature, and are often outside the control of the individual or family concerned. These may include:

  • poverty;
  • a lack of affordable housing;
  • housing policies;
  • the structure and administration of government support; and
  • wider policy developments, such as the closure of  psychiatric hospitals.

The Canadian Alliance to End Homelessness
http://www.caeh.ca/about-homelessness/

Dignity for All, a campaign between Citizens for Public Justice and Canada Without Poverty, reveals that homelessness will end if all levels of government (including First Nations, Métis governments, and Inuit Land Claim Organizations) collaborate to prevent homelessness.

“The Special Rapporteur calls for Canada to adopt a comprehensive and coordinated national housing policy based on indivisibility of human rights and the protection of the most vulnerable. This national strategy should include measurable goals and timetables, consultation and collaboration with affected communities, complaints procedures, and transparent accountability mechanisms.30
Miloon Kothari, Special Rapporteur on Adequate Housing, Report: Mission to Canada October 2007. Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights

http://www.cwp-csp.ca/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/DignityForAll_Report-English-FINAL.compressed.pdf

This growing crisis, Housing and Homelessness (March 2011), is delineated in Dignity for All’s recently released report, A National Anti-Poverty Plan for Canada, as follows. Read more of Canadian Homelessness Will End If All Levels of Government Collaborate

Image extracted from video below.

Image extracted from video below.

TTC 2015-2024 Budget Meeting on Feb.2, 2015

The Toronto Transit Commission (TTC) will hold a special Board meeting on the 2015 TTC Wheel-Trans and Operating budgets and the 2015-2024 TTC Capital budget.

  • The meeting will take place on Monday, February 2, 9:30 a.m., Toronto City Hall, Committee Room # 2.
  • The meeting is open to the public.
  • This meeting will deal with the following items:
  1. 2015 TTC and Wheel-Trans Operating Budgets
  2. 2015-2024 TTC Capital Budget

This video presents The Toronto 2015 Budget will #getTOmoving.

Toronto Mayor John Tory and TTC Chair Josh Colle recently announced a $95 million investment that will “significantly expand and enhance transit service, reduce wait times and crowding, and make using the TTC more affordable for families by eliminating fares for children 12 years and under.”

  • To help balance the TTC budget, Mayor Tory asked the City to increase the TTC’s subsidy to nearly $479 million, an increase of more than $38 million from 2014. Effective March 1, as well, a 10-cent proportionate fare increase will apply to all TTC fares except for cash fares, investing an additional $43 million in revenue to pay for new services that will meet an increasing ridership, estimated to be 545 million in 2015.

These new investments will provide the following enhanced services to Toronto commuters:

  • Restoration of all day, everyday bus service that was cut in 2011.
  • Ten-minute or better bus and streetcar service on key routes from 6 a.m. to 1 a.m. six days a week (9 a.m. on Sundays).
  • Reduced wait times and crowding at off-peak times.
  • Reduced wait times and crowding on 21 of the busiest routes during morning and afternoon rush hours.
  • Proof-of-payment and all-door boarding on all streetcar routes.
  • Expansion of the Express Bus network, adding four new routes to a network that serves 34 million rides annually.
  • Expanding the Blue Night Network, adding 12 routes to the 22-route network that serves 4 million rides annually.
  • Adding up to two additional subway trains on Lines 1 and 2 during morning and afternoon rush hours.
  • Route management improvements designed to reduce short-turns, bunching and gapping of bus and streetcar routes.
  • Additional resources to focus on subway reliability around signals, track and communications systems.
  • 50 new buses and a temporary storage facility to allow for the Express Bus network expansion, reduction of wait times and crowding on some peak-period routes, as well as the need for spare buses during maintenance.

Timing of the introduction of additional service, as well as the restoration of service, is being developed by staff. Financial details of the new services will be detailed in the February 2 budget report to the TTC board.

Please click here to read the Agenda and Reports from February 2, 2015.

City of Toronto 2015 Budget Meeting Feb.2 & 3

This video presents 2015 Toronto Budget – The Capital Budget.

  • Learn more about the City of Toronto’s capital budget.

The City of Toronto’s Budget Committee will hear pubic presentations on the proposed 2015 Operating Budget and the 2015-2024 Capital Budget and Plan at the following times and locations: Read more of You’re Invited: Toronto 2015 Budget Meeting Feb.2 & 3 + TTC 2015-2024 Budget Meeting Feb.2, 2015

Above, CFIA's Electron Microscope Image of Salmonella bacteria. (In reality Salmonella is not pink; the pink colour is added as visual aid.)

Above, CFIA’s Electron Microscope Image of Salmonella bacteria. (In reality Salmonella is not pink; the pink colour is added as visual aid.)

This is an update to the previous blog, Health Hazard Alert: Go Raw Brand Organic Spicy Seed Mix is Recalled.

Ecomax Nutrition is recalling Go Raw brand 100% Organic Sprouted Sunflower Seeds from the marketplace due to possible Salmonella bacteria contamination.

  • Consumers should not consume the recalled product.

Please click here for description and photos of the affected product.

Other details of the recall are as follows. Read more of Second List of Recalled Go Raw Brand Organic Seed Products: 100% Organic Sprouted Sunflower Seeds

Canadian Food Inspection Agency

Canadian Food Inspection Agency

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is recalling Atlantic Sprout Farm brand Chinese Mung Bean Sprouts due to faecal coliforms.

  • CFIA Reference number: 9599.

Please click here for the description of the affected products.

The other details of this recall are as follows. Read more of Health Hazard Alert: Atlantic Sprout Farm Brand Chinese Mung Bean Sprouts are Recalled

This is an update to these previous blogs regarding certain beancurd products that are recalled due to non-permitted colours:

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is recalling more Te Chang Food brand bean curd products due to non-permitted colours.

  • CFIA Reference number: 9585.

Please click here for the description of the affected products (third list of recalled bean curd products).

The other details of this recall are as follows. Read more of Third List of Recalled Bean Curd Products: More Te Chang Food Brand Bean Curd Products

This is an update to the previous blog regarding certain beancurd products that are recalled due to non-permitted colours: Health Hazard Alert: Te Chang Food Brand Bean Curd Products are Recalled (first list of recalled beancurd products).

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is recalling Wei Hsin and Yu Hsiang brand bean curd products due to non-permitted colours.

  • CFIA Reference number: 9580.

Please click here for the description of the affected products (second list of recalled bean curd products).

The other details of this recall are as follows. Read more of Second List of Recalled Bean Curd Products: Wei Hsin and Yu Hsiang Brand Bean Curd Products