Radiation Alert for Canadians in Japan: Canada's Advices and Responses

Here are the responses of Canada for Canadians in Japan:

  • Canada has chartered two buses to transport Canadians and other foreign nationals out of the areas affected by the March 11 earthquake and tsunami.
  • The Emergency Operations Centre in Ottawa has been contacting Canadians in the affected areas who registered with the Registration of Canadians Abroad service to advise them of the availability of bus transportation.
  • Canadians interested in boarding one of the available buses who have not been contacted should call the Embassy of Canada in Tokyo at 81-3-5412-6200 or the Emergency Operations Centre in Ottawa at 613-944-2471 or 613-943-1055.

Here are crucial advices for Canadians in Japan:

  • DFAIT advises against non-essential travel to Tokyo and surrounding areas, as well as the prefectures of Chiba, Miyagi, Ibaraki, Iwate, Aomori and Fukushima. Sendai City, Fukushima City and Aomori City have been hardest hit.
  • Japanese authorities recommend that individuals refrain from travelling to Japan for humanitarian purposes unless requested by the Government of Japan.
  • OFFICIAL WARNING: Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada advises against all travel within 80 km of the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant.
  • Following damage to the Fukushima nuclear power station in Okumacho, Canadians are strongly advised to follow the advice issued by the Japanese authorities. An evacuation order is in effect for the zone within 20km of the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant. Japanese authorities recommend that people between 20km and 30km from the plant remain indoors with windows and doors closed and refrain from using ventilation systems.
  • Canadians living within 80 km of the Fukushima nuclear power plant are advised that they should, as a further precautionary measure, evacuate this area.
  • There is no radiation health risk to Canadians travelling into or out of Japan, provided they have not been within the evacuation zone established by Japan.
  • Based on current information, areas outside the Japanese evacuation zone are not subject to radiation levels associated with a health risk. Health risks exist within the Japanese evacuation zone; therefore, all Canadians are advised to follow the direction given by the Japanese authorities and should not enter these areas.
  • Presently, Canada has assessed that at this stage there is no indication that there is a radiation health risk to Canadian citizens in Japan and other countries in Asia.

Foreign Affairs
And International Trade Canada

Warnings and Advisories

Recent Updates

“In March 11, 2011, a powerful 9.0 earthquake struck off the east coast of Honshu, Japan and a series of significant aftershocks have already struck the same area.

Government of Canada Officials in Ottawa and at our Embassy in Tokyo are closely monitoring the situation and are working closely with local authorities to identify and locate Canadians in need of assistance. Embassy staff are providing consular assistance where required.

Travel advice

The Government of Canada has chartered two buses to transport Canadians and other foreign nationals out of the areas affected by the March 11 earthquake and tsunami. The Emergency Operations Centre in Ottawa has been contacting Canadians in the affected areas who registered with our Registration of Canadians Abroad service to advise them of the availability of bus transportation. Canadians interested in boarding one of the available buses who have not been contacted should call the Embassy of Canada in Tokyo at 81-3-5412-6200 or the Emergency Operations Centre in Ottawa at 613-944-2471 or 613-943-1055.

Canadians planning to travel to Japan are advised to confirm their travel arrangements with their airline, tour group, or travel agent before heading to the airport.

DFAIT advises against non-essential travel to Tokyo and surrounding areas, as well as the prefectures of Chiba, Miyagi, Ibaraki, Iwate, Aomori and Fukushima. Sendai City, Fukushima City and Aomori City have been hardest hit.

Japanese authorities recommend that individuals refrain from travelling to Japan for humanitarian purposes unless requested by the Government of Japan.

Information on radiation levels in Japan

Following consultations with Government of Canada experts, and based on information available from the Government of Japan and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Canada has assessed that at this stage there is no indication that there is a radiation health risk to Canadian citizens in Japan and other countries in Asia.

Given the evolving situation, Canadians living within 80 km of the Fukushima nuclear power plant are advised that they should, as a further precautionary measure, evacuate this area. The directions of the Japanese government and local emergency response personnel should also be followed by all Canadians in Japan.

There is no radiation health risk to Canadians travelling into or out of Japan, provided they have not been within the evacuation zone established by Japan.

Based on current information, areas outside the Japanese evacuation zone are not subject to radiation levels associated with a health risk. Health risks exist within the Japanese evacuation zone; therefore, all Canadians are advised to follow the direction given by the Japanese authorities and should not enter these areas.

The situation in Japan is not expected to pose any health or safety risk to Canada.

Canada and Canadians’ offer to help

Canada is offering to Japan an array of expertise and technical assistance as part of international efforts to help Japan respond to and recover from the devastating earthquake.

17 March 2011 - 25,000 thermal blankets provided Govt. of Canada and Canadian Red Cross arrive in Tokyo, Japan
17 March 2011 – 25,000 thermal blankets provided Govt. of Canada and Canadian Red Cross arrive in Tokyo, Japan

These include a 17-member Disaster Victim Identification team, as well as chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear technical expertise and equipment. Canada is offering Canadian Forces assets—including strategic airlift and personnel—to facilitate humanitarian relief efforts in addition to relief stocks, and emergency medical and engineering capabilities.

Canadians often feel strongly about helping to support communities affected by this tragic natural disaster. Often the best way to help is to donate money to experienced humanitarian organizations that are raising money to support relief efforts or that are active in the emergency response.

Government-wide effort

There are currently 13 Canadian federal departments and agencies collaborating within Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada’s Task Force on Natural Disasters Abroad.

The Government of Canada is also working in close coordination with provincial and territorial authorities and stands ready to respond to other specific requests for assistance.

The Government of Canada extends its condolences to all those affected by this significant natural disaster.”

Please click here for the latest updates, figures and more info.

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