Ontario’s Draft Plan to Improve Pollinator Health & Reduce Pollinator Losses: Send Your Comments before March 7, 2016

The following video presents “Creating Pollinator Habitat in Ontario”

“One of the major issues that ALUS is trying to address is the recent decline of pollinators. Bayham ALUS project coordinator Kyle Mauthe explains how demonstration farm M&R Orchards has planted native wild flowers to create pollinator habitat.”

This is an update to the following blog, Ontario’s Rules to Reduce Neonicotinoid Pesticide: Protect Bees: Submit Comments Until May 7, 2015.

The Government of Ontario aims to protect pollinators by addressing the four main stressors that pollinators face: loss of habitat and nutrition; diseases, pests and genetics; pesticide exposure; climate change and weather.

The Province is proposing a draft Pollinator Health Action Plan, a component of its comprehensive Pollinator Health Strategy, as a plan for government, stakeholders and the public to work in partnership to enhance the state of health of Ontario’s pollinators, both managed and wild, and to strengthen their populations.

Public Consultation:

This proposal has been posted for a 45 day public review and comment period starting January 22, 2016.

Please Note: All comments and submissions received will become part of the public record. You will not receive a formal response to your comment, however, relevant comments received as part of the public participation process for this proposal will be considered by the decision maker for this proposal.

Other Public Consultation Opportunities:

In addition to submitting comments via this notice or in writing, you can:

  • Email your comments to pollinatorhealth@ontario.ca and,

Pollinator Health Action Plan survey

“Share your thoughts and recommendations on our draft Pollinator Health Action Plan and help us improve pollinator health in the province. Your feedback will be considered by the Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs when we report back to the public with a final Action Plan in spring/summer of 2016.”

Image grab from video above

Image grab from video above

NEWS RELEASE

Province Seeking Public Input on Improving Pollinator Health

Ontario Taking Action to Reduce Pollinator Losses

January 22, 2016 1:00 P.M.

Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs

Ontario is seeking public feedback on a draft action plan to improve pollinator health and reduce pollinator losses.

Pollinators, including honey bees, are essential to Ontario’s agricultural sector and contribute approximately $992 million worth of economic activity annually to the economy. The province became the first jurisdiction in North America to protect bees and other pollinators through new rules introduced on July 1, 2015, to reduce the number of acres planted with neonicotinoid-treated corn and soybean seeds by 80 per cent by 2017. Read more of Ontario’s Draft Plan to Improve Pollinator Health & Reduce Pollinator Losses: Send Your Comments before March 7, 2016

Ontario Approved the 22nd and Final Source Water Protection Plan, Covering More Than 450 Municipal Drinking Water Systems for Canadians

The following video presents Source Water Protection in Ontario:

Ontario’s comprehensive approach to protect drinking water reached a milestone this month when the province approved the 22nd and final source water protection plan, covering more than 450 municipal drinking water systems across Ontario.

In 2006, Ontario passed the Clean Water Act.

“The Act required the creation of local source protection committees to identify threats and develop plans to protect water at its source – in rivers, lakes and aquifers….

Some of the threats the plans identify include:

  • Leaking septic systems
  • Fertilizer, manure, pesticide and roadsalt polluting the flow of water over land i.e. runoff
  • Micro-plastics

The next step is for the plans to be carried out. In some cases, this means that activities that pose a significant risk to drinking water sources won’t be permitted. In other cases, plans will be developed to ensure that activities identified in the source water protection plan don’t pose a threat. The measures will vary to match the risks and could include risk management approaches, land use planning, education about activities on vulnerable source water area, and potential bylaw changes….

The chief Drinking Water Inspector’s Annual Report (pdf), released last week, shows that municipal drinking water systems and non-municipal year-round residential systems have met drinking water quality standards (for microbiological, chemical and radiological parameters) in over 99% of tests.

Public access to municipal drinking water data has been improved, with the Open Data catalogue of the information from the Drinking Water report – this will be updated throughout the year.”

http://environmentaldefence.ca/blog/protecting-ontario%E2%80%99s-drinking-water-current-and-future-generations

NEWS RELEASE

Ontario Approves 22 Local Source Water Protection Plans

Outstanding Local Efforts Protect Municipal Drinking Water

December 21, 2015 1:00 P.M.
Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change

Ontario’s comprehensive approach to protect drinking water reached a milestone this month when the province approved the 22nd and final source water protection plan, covering more than 450 municipal drinking water systems across Ontario.

Source water protection plans are locally developed, science-based plans designed to protect the health of lakes, rivers and underground water sources that supply municipal drinking water systems. The plans set out actions to eliminate, manage or reduce potential risks to drinking water sources and Ontario is among the few jurisdictions in Canada to have source water protection plans in place. They are an important part of Ontario’s approach to protect drinking water from source to tap, preventing potential issues before problems occur. Read more of Ontario Approved the 22nd and Final Source Water Protection Plan, Covering More Than 450 Municipal Drinking Water Systems for Canadians

Top 10 Tips for a Greener Holiday in Ontario, Canada: Make Environmentally Friendly Choices to Help Fight Climate Change & Keep Ontario’s Air, Land & Water Clean

The following video presents Together We Can Change Climate Change:

“Ontario is a world leader in fighting climate change.

Alongside our global partners, we’re making a difference. Ontario is building transit friendly cities to cut down on vehicle emissions and helping businesses reduce their carbon footprint. And perhaps most importantly, we’ve ended coal-fired electricity generation in the province.

Together we can change climate change.

Learn more about what Ontario’s doing to fight climate change at ontario.ca/climatechange

A descriptive transcript for this video is available by visiting the following link:”

http://media.ontarionewsroom.com/desc…

Image grab from video above

Image grab from video above

NEWS RELEASE

Reduce, Reuse, Recycle, Rejoice!

Top 10 Tips for a Greener Holiday


Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change

Help keep this holiday season merry and bright by making environmentally friendly choices to help fight climate change and keep Ontario’s air, land, and water clean.

  • Choose energy-efficient holiday lights and put them on timers to save on electricity bills.
  • Reduce waste by sending holiday greeting cards electronically, or pick cards printed on recycled paper.
  • Choose a real, Ontario-grown Christmas tree from a local tree farm or retailer.
  • Make your holiday travel as green and safe as possible. Carpool or take public transit to holiday parties. If you have to fly over the holidays, consider purchasing carbon offsets.
  • Make your festive dinners environmentally friendly while supporting local businesses. Choose from Ontario’s wide range of local foods available in December.
  • Shop local or buy gifts made from Ontario wood or recycled non-toxic plastic.
  • Keep batteries out of landfills by giving gifts that don’t need batteries. If you need batteries, make them rechargeable.
  • Get creative with your wrapping. Reuse paper from household items like calendars, newspapers and fabric or decorate brown craft paper that can go in the Blue Box. Reuse your wrapping paper for other holiday decorating.
  • Buy gifts with less packaging, and recycle when you can.
  • Bring your own reusable shopping bags to stores.

Quick Facts Read more of Top 10 Tips for a Greener Holiday in Ontario, Canada: Make Environmentally Friendly Choices to Help Fight Climate Change & Keep Ontario’s Air, Land & Water Clean

Ontario’s New Protection Plans for Sources of Water for Canadians: CTC Source & Halton-Hamilton Source: Effective Dec. 31, 2015

CTC (Credit Valley, Toronto and Region, and Central Lake Ontario) Source Protection Plan,  and the Halton-Hamilton Source Protection Plan were developed by local municipal and community partners to protect the quality and quantity of water sources that supply municipal drinking water systems around Credit Valley, Toronto and Region and Central Lake Ontario, and Halton-Hamilton.and Halton-Hamilton  Source Protection Plan, and the Halton-Hamilton Source Protection Plan

The following video presents Source Water Protection in Ontario:

  • Distributed by Ministry of the Environment to Conservation Ontario & Conservation Authorities July 18, 2006.

Are you affected?

Also, Ontario has a tool to help you screen whether or not a property may be subject to the Source Protection Plan Policies, at http://www.ctcswp.ca/are-you-affected/ .

 

NEWS RELEASE

Province Protecting Sources of Drinking Water in the GTHA

Ontario Approves Two More Source Protection Plans

August 14, 2015 1:30 P.M. Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change

Ontario has approved two plans to protect sources of drinking water in the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area.

Ontario Regulation 284/07 under the Clean Water Act, 2006 designates the Halton-Hamilton Source Protection Region as comprising the lands under the jurisdiction of the Halton Region Conservation Authority and the Hamilton Conservation Authority.

Halton-Hamilton Source Protection Region. Ontario Regulation 284/07 under the Clean Water Act, 2006 designates the Halton-Hamilton Source Protection Region as comprising the lands under the jurisdiction of the Halton Region Conservation Authority and the Hamilton Conservation Authority.

The CTC Source Protection Plan, and Halton-Hamilton  Source Protection Plan, and the Halton-Hamilton Source Protection Plan were developed by local municipal and community partners to protect the quality and quantity of water sources that supply municipal drinking water systems around Credit Valley, Toronto and Region and Central Lake Ontario, and Halton-Hamilton. The plans set out actions to eliminate, manage or reduce potential risks to these drinking water sources.

Many municipalities in the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area will now be responsible for: Read more of Ontario’s New Protection Plans for Sources of Water for Canadians: CTC Source & Halton-Hamilton Source: Effective Dec. 31, 2015

Ontario’s Rules to Reduce Neonicotinoid Pesticide: Protect Bees: Submit Comments Until May 7, 2015

Pesticide spraying: Image extracted from the CTV News video below.

Pesticide spraying: Image extracted from the CTV News video below.

This is an update to these previous blogs:

The following video presents 2013 09 26 – TV News Story – Canadian Bee Crisis:

“Environmental groups want federal Health Minister Rona Ambrose to reconsider Health Canada’s decision to re-approve a pesticide — severely restricted in Europe and linked to massive bee die-offs in Canada — for use on fruits, potatoes and turf. Lawyers from the Canadian Environmental Law Association and Ecojustice have filed a Notice of Objection with the health minister on behalf of Sierra Club Canada, Wilderness Committee, David Suzuki Foundation and Équiterre. The objection concerns Health Canada’s recent decision to renew the registration for clothianidin, a neonicotinoid pesticide toxic to bees, which the groups say should be banned in Canada.

Over the past two years, massive bee die-offs reported in Manitoba, Ontario and Quebec were linked to the use of neonicotinoid pesticides. In addition, a growing body of scientific literature documents the adverse effects of neonicotinoids on the foraging and homing behaviour of bees, as well as metabolic, immune and reproductive functions.”

Ontario is taking the strongest action in North America to protect bees, birds, butterflies, and other pollinators by proposing new rules that would reduce the number of acres planted with neonicotinoid-treated corn and soybean seeds by 80 per cent by 2017.

  • Some neonicotinoid insecticides are toxic to bees and other beneficial insects.
  • In the winter of 2013-2014, bee deaths in Ontario reached 58 per cent. The generally accepted level by those who care for and breed bees is 15 per cent.
  • Bees and other pollinators are responsible for pollinating roughly 13 per cent of agricultural crops in Ontario (crops worth about $897 million), and support $26 million annually in honey production.
  • Ontario’s agri-food sector employs 760,000 individuals and contributes $34 billion each year to the province’s economy.

“A comprehensive Pollinator Health Action Plan would improve the state of pollinator health in Ontario and strengthen their populations. The plan we are proposing to develop will promote a sustainable food supply, healthy ecosystems and a strong economy.”

The proposed regulation sets rules for the sale and use of neonicotinoid-treated corn and soybean seeds.

  • The amendments to Ontario Regulation 63/09, under the Pesticides Act would establish:
    • a new class of pesticides consisting of corn and soybean seeds treated with the neonicotinoids, imidacloprid, clothianidin or thiamethoxam,
    • rules for the sale and use of treated seeds,
    • timing and implementation of the regulatory requirements.

The draft regulation is available for public comment on the environmental registry until May 7, 2015. You can submit your comments in the following three ways: Read more of Ontario’s Rules to Reduce Neonicotinoid Pesticide: Protect Bees: Submit Comments Until May 7, 2015

Climate Change Strategy Discussion Paper for Ontario, Canada: Consultations in Feb. & March + Submit Your Comments by March 29, 2015

This video presents Climate Change 2014: Mitigation of Climate Change.

Ontario recently released a climate change discussion paper (pdf) and invites citizens, businesses and communities to share ideas about how to “successfully fight climate change while fostering economic growth and keeping our businesses competitive.”

Minister’s Message

Climate change is the critical issue of our time. Two numbers that are vital for Ontarians to be aware of: 4, the number of degrees in this century that the planet is on track to warm by, and 6, the number, in trillions of dollars of new economic growth that will result from moving to a low-carbon economy.

A 4 degree increase in the mean temperature of our planet will have catastrophic consequences. Severe weather events are already driving up insurance costs and severely damaging our infrastructure. Food security and costs will be an early problem as climate change impacts where our food is grown and affects our water supply.

Climate change is a problem with a solution. Reducing our carbon emissions will produce a new innovation economy in Ontario. Building on our early leadership in sustainable technology and innovation, Ontario is well positioned to seize the opportunities of a low-carbon economy if we are prepared to take bold action.

Reducing our energy costs through the establishment of new building standards, and the use of new technologies, will enable us to reduce the emissions from our homes.

Moving to low-carbon and zero emission transportation options will allow us to move to and from our homes and jobs more efficiently, while improving the air we breathe and growing our manufacturing sector.

The new low-carbon economy will mean more and better jobs. It will avoid an environmental crisis and secure our future as a global green service and industrial economy leader.

We have already made great strides by eliminating coal power generation in Ontario, strengthening our building code, and beginning to electrify GO transit, but there is much more that must be done. We know we can do this and your participation in developing this strategy is essential to our success.

Glen Murray
Minister of the Environment and Climate Change
Ontario’s Climate Change Discussion Paper 2015
http://www.downloads.ene.gov.on.ca/envision/env_reg/er/documents/2015/012-3452.pdf

Figure 1 shows that in the absence of new actions, we expect Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions to begin to rise again as our economy and population grow. The illustrative wedges emphasise the importance of taking action early as delays take us further from our targets.

Figure 1 shows that in the absence of new actions, we expect Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions to begin to rise again as our economy and population grow. The illustrative wedges emphasise the importance of taking action early as delays take us further from our targets.

The discussion paper’s purposes are as follows.

  • It identifies the climate change challenge, the risks and threats it poses to Ontario’s environment, economy and way of life.
  • This discussion paper suggests actions that encourage individuals, businesses, government and communities to do more to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHG).
Figure 3 shows the sectors responsible for greenhouse gas emissions in Ontario. Ontario’s 2012 GHG emissions are estimated to be 167 Mt. The transportation sector had the largest share of emissions, followed by the industrial and buildings sectors. It also focuses the mind on how to change current behaviours. It is important to note that this pie chart only captures emissions and does not reflect the important role and value of carbon sinks in removing carbon from the atmosphere, for example in the forestry and agricultural sectors.

Figure 3 shows the sectors responsible for greenhouse gas emissions in Ontario. Ontario’s 2012 GHG emissions are estimated to be 167 Mt. The transportation sector had the largest share of emissions, followed by the industrial and buildings sectors. It also focuses the mind on how to change current behaviours. It is important to note that this pie chart only captures emissions and does not reflect the important role and value of carbon sinks in removing carbon from the atmosphere, for example in the forestry and agricultural sectors.

  • Also, the paper presents considerations for Ontario’s approach to addressing climate change over the short and long term. “There are various tools at our disposal including carbon pricing and climate critical policy areas.”
Globally, 39 national and 23 sub-national jurisdictions have implemented or are scheduled to implement carbon pricing instruments, including emissions trading systems and taxes. http://www.worldbank.org/en/news/feature/2014/05/28/state-trends-report-tracks-global-growth-carbon-pricing

Globally, 39 national and 23 sub-national jurisdictions have implemented or are scheduled to implement carbon pricing instruments, including emissions trading systems and taxes. http://www.worldbank.org/en/news/feature/2014/05/28/state-trends-report-tracks-global-growth-carbon-pricing

  • And it asks important questions to:
    • help inform a comprehensive climate change strategy and action plan, to be released later this year, and
    • determine which initiatives and programs currently underway are the most effective in reducing emissions and building resilience in order for Ontario to meet its emissions targets and adaptation goals.

This discussion paper invites comments through a series of questions at the end of the paper.

  • Your answers will help inform a climate change strategy and action plan to be released in 2015.

This document will be posted to the Environmental Bill of Rights for a 45 day comment period.

  • This proposal has been posted for a 45 day public review and comment period starting February 12, 2015.
  • If you have any questions, or would like to submit your comments, please do so by March 29, 2015 to:
    • Kathy Hering
      Senior Policy Analyst
      Ministry of the Environment
      Climate Change and Environmental Policy Division
      Air Policy and Climate Change Branch
      77 Wellesley Street West
      Floor 10
      Toronto Ontario
      M7A2T5
      Phone: (416) 326-8092
  • Additionally, you may submit your comments on-line at http://www.ebr.gov.on.ca/ERS-WEB-External/displaynoticecontent.do?noticeId=MTI0Mzcz&statusId=MTg3MjY0&language=en
  • All comments received prior to March 29, 2015 will be considered as part of the decision-making process by the Ministry of the Environment if they are submitted in writing or electronically using the form provided in the notice at http://www.ebr.gov.on.ca/ERS-WEB-External/searchComment.do?actionType=add&noticeId=MTI0Mzcz&statusId=MTg3MjY0&noticeHeaderIdString=MTI0Mzcz and reference EBR Registry number 012-3452.
  • Please Note: All comments and submissions received will become part of the public record. You will not receive a formal response to your comment, however, relevant comments received as part of the public participation process for this proposal will be considered by the decision maker for this proposal.

During and after that time, focused discussions, town halls meetings and stakeholder forums will be organized to ensure that the themes and approach are considered from a number of stakeholder perspectives.

You should consider and provide your perspective to the following questions. The questions are organized along these five themes: Read more of Climate Change Strategy Discussion Paper for Ontario, Canada: Consultations in Feb. & March + Submit Your Comments by March 29, 2015