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Community Frugal Crowd Green Health & Wellness Videos

Ontario’s Rules to Reduce Neonicotinoid Pesticide: Protect Bees: Submit Comments Until May 7, 2015

Pesticide spraying: Image extracted from the CTV News video below.
Pesticide spraying: Image extracted from the CTV News video below.

This is an update to these previous blogs:

The following video presents 2013 09 26 – TV News Story – Canadian Bee Crisis:

“Environmental groups want federal Health Minister Rona Ambrose to reconsider Health Canada’s decision to re-approve a pesticide — severely restricted in Europe and linked to massive bee die-offs in Canada — for use on fruits, potatoes and turf. Lawyers from the Canadian Environmental Law Association and Ecojustice have filed a Notice of Objection with the health minister on behalf of Sierra Club Canada, Wilderness Committee, David Suzuki Foundation and Équiterre. The objection concerns Health Canada’s recent decision to renew the registration for clothianidin, a neonicotinoid pesticide toxic to bees, which the groups say should be banned in Canada.

Over the past two years, massive bee die-offs reported in Manitoba, Ontario and Quebec were linked to the use of neonicotinoid pesticides. In addition, a growing body of scientific literature documents the adverse effects of neonicotinoids on the foraging and homing behaviour of bees, as well as metabolic, immune and reproductive functions.”

Ontario is taking the strongest action in North America to protect bees, birds, butterflies, and other pollinators by proposing new rules that would reduce the number of acres planted with neonicotinoid-treated corn and soybean seeds by 80 per cent by 2017.

  • Some neonicotinoid insecticides are toxic to bees and other beneficial insects.
  • In the winter of 2013-2014, bee deaths in Ontario reached 58 per cent. The generally accepted level by those who care for and breed bees is 15 per cent.
  • Bees and other pollinators are responsible for pollinating roughly 13 per cent of agricultural crops in Ontario (crops worth about $897 million), and support $26 million annually in honey production.
  • Ontario’s agri-food sector employs 760,000 individuals and contributes $34 billion each year to the province’s economy.

“A comprehensive Pollinator Health Action Plan would improve the state of pollinator health in Ontario and strengthen their populations. The plan we are proposing to develop will promote a sustainable food supply, healthy ecosystems and a strong economy.”

The proposed regulation sets rules for the sale and use of neonicotinoid-treated corn and soybean seeds.

  • The amendments to Ontario Regulation 63/09, under the Pesticides Act would establish:
    • a new class of pesticides consisting of corn and soybean seeds treated with the neonicotinoids, imidacloprid, clothianidin or thiamethoxam,
    • rules for the sale and use of treated seeds,
    • timing and implementation of the regulatory requirements.

The draft regulation is available for public comment on the environmental registry until May 7, 2015. You can submit your comments in the following three ways:

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Community Health & Wellness

Mandatory Labelling of Mechanically Tenderized Beef to Help Improve Food Safety for Canadians

This video presents “New health and safety labels on beef to prevent bacterial food poisoning.”

  • “Mechanically tenderized beef now ID’d with sticker indicating cooking temp of 63 C.”

Mechanically Tenderized Beef (MTB): Greater Risk of E. coli O157 Bacteria Contamination from MTB Products When Compared to Intact Cuts of Beef

Here is Health Canada’s explanation.

In 2012, 18 cases of foodborne illness caused by Escherichia coli O157 (E. coli O157) were reported as part of a Canadian outbreak associated with contaminated beef.

  • During the food safety investigation following the outbreak, five cases were considered to be likely associated with the consumption of beef that had been mechanically tenderized at the retail level.

Mechanical tenderization of meat is a practice that has been used by processors, food services and retailers for many years to improve the tenderness and flavour of beef.

  • The process of mechanically tenderizing meat involves using instruments such as needles or blades to break-down, penetrate or pierce its surface disrupting the muscle fibers, or injecting it with a marinade or tenderizing solution.
  • It is not necessarily apparent by just looking at a mechanically tenderized meat product that it has undergone this process.

In general, the internal temperature of a steak or other solid cut of beef is not a significant concern given that any harmful bacteria that may be present would normally be on the surface of the meat and would be inactivated during cooking.

  • However, when steaks and beef cuts are mechanically tenderized, there is a potential for bacteria to be transferred from the surface to the centre of the meat.
  • Therefore, there may be an increased risk to consumers from MTB.

In May 2013, Health Canada completed a health risk assessment specifically focused on E. coli O157 in MTB (Catford et al., 2013).

  • The results of the assessment showed a five-fold increase in risk from MTB products when compared to intactFootnote 1 cuts of beef.
  • The assessment also noted that without labels, it is difficult for Canadians to identify which beef products have been mechanically tenderized.

Health Minister Rona Ambrose recently announced the following new labelling requirements for mechanically tenderized beef (MTB) to help consumers know when they are buying MTB products and how to cook them:

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Community Health & Wellness Videos

Patient is in Isolation and Being Tested For Contagious Ebola Virus Disease: Ontario, Canada

This video presents “2014 August 3 Breaking News Ebola Crisis Doctors Without Borders warns outbreak out of control.”

  • “2014 August 3 Breaking News Ebola Crisis Doctors Without Borders warns that the outbreak in Guinea, Sierra Leone, and Liberia is now out of control.”

“…But government public health officials have been trying to reassure Canadians they need not worry, reminding people that the virus doesn’t spread easily through casual contact or the air, like the flu, and that one can only become infected though direct contact with infected bodily fluids.

In a recent statement, Health Minister Rona Ambrose stressed that all points of entry into Canada are routinely monitored, and travellers showing symptoms are referred to quarantine officers who have the authority to implement public health measures under the Quarantine Act to protect Canadians…

Canadian hospitals also have sophisticated infection control systems and procedures in place that are designed to limit the spread of infection and protect health care workers…”

Mark Gollom, CBC News
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ebola-outbreak-how-canada-s-prep-has-led-the-world-1.2728188

CBC News also reported that an “Ebola ‘cocktail’ developed at Canadian and U.S. labs” is an experimental drug that neutralizes the virus so it can’t do further damage.

  • An experimental Ebola treatment (ZMapp) was given to two American aid workers infected in Liberia which is one of four West African nations dealing with the world’s largest Ebola outbreak.
    • “The Public Health Agency of Canada said it was involved in the development of ZMapp, but the agency was not involved in the decisions to administer the treatment.”
  • “The World Health Organization says that as of Aug. 1, there have been at least 1,603 cases of Ebola in the current outbreak, which is centred in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia.
    • At least 887 of those people have died.”

“The workers, Nancy Writebol and Dr. Kent Brantly, are improving, although it’s impossible to know whether the treatment is the reason or they are recovering on their own, as others who have survived Ebola have done…

The experimental treatment the U.S. aid workers are getting is called ZMapp and is made by Mapp Biopharmaceutical Inc. of San Diego. It is aimed at boosting the immune system’s efforts to fight off Ebola and is made from antibodies produced by lab animals exposed to parts of the virus.

In a statement, the company said it was working with LeafBio of San Diego, Defyrus Inc. of Toronto, the U.S. government and the Public Health Agency of Canada on development of the drug, which was identified as a possible treatment in January.

The drug is made in tobacco plants at Kentucky BioProcessing, a subsidiary of Reynolds American Inc., in Owensboro, Kentucky, said spokesman David Howard. The plant “serves like a photocopier,” and the drug is extracted from the plant, he said…

The Kentucky company is working “to increase production of ZMapp but that process is going to take several months,” Howard said. The drug has been tested in animals and testing in humans is expected to begin later this year.

Writebol, 59, has been in isolation at her home in Liberia since she was diagnosed last month. She’s now walking with assistance and has regained her appetite, said Bruce Johnson, president of SIM USA, the Charlotte, North Carolina-based group that she works for in Africa.

Writebol has received two doses of the experimental drug so far…

Brantly, 33, also was said to be improving. Besides the experimental dose he got in Liberia, he also received a unit of blood from a 14-year-old boy, an Ebola survivor, who had been under his care. That seems to be aimed at giving Brantly antibodies the boy may have made to the virus…

Ebola is only spread through direct contact with an infected person’s blood or other bodily fluids, not through the air…”

MARILYNN MARCHIONE AP Chief Medical Writer, ABC News
http://abcnews.go.com/Health/wireStory/us-govt-role-ebola-drug-aid-workers-24840281

Brampton Civic Hospital in Ontario, Canada, is currently testing a patient who recently travelled to Canada from Nigeria and presented with symptoms including fever, headache and malaise.

  • Samples have been sent to the National Microbiology Laboratory in Winnipeg.
    • Results of the testing are expected within the next 24 hours.
  • The patient is currently in isolation and is being treated for a fever and other flu-like symptoms.
Electron Microscope Image of Ebola Virus: Image extracted from video below. (In reality, Ebola is neither blue, red or white. Colours are added as visual aids.)
Electron Microscope Image of Ebola Virus: Image extracted from video below. (In reality, Ebola is neither blue, red or white. Colours are added as visual aids.)

NEWS RELEASE

Update On Patient Being Tested For Ebola Virus Disease in Ontario

Ontario Hospital Testing Patient as Precautionary Measure

August 9, 2014 5:45 P.M.

Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care

William Osler Health System’s Brampton Civic Hospital is currently testing a patient who recently travelled to Canada from Nigeria and presented with symptoms including fever, headache and malaise.

This action was taken as a precautionary measure and results of the testing are expected within the next 24 hours. Samples have been sent to the National Microbiology Laboratory in Winnipeg.

The patient is currently in isolation and is being treated for a fever and other flu-like symptoms.

The Minister of Health is closely managing the situation and is in close contact with the Chief Medical Officer of Health, the local public health unit and the hospital.

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Community Frugal Crowd Health & Wellness

CFIA Can Issue Monetary Penalities to Businesses That Do Not Meet Canada’s Meat Safety Requirements

This video presents “Canada’s Meat Industry – The Canadian Advantage.”

Canada’s meat industry includes the following profitable items:

  • Beef and Veal
    • By 2014, there were 12.215 million cattle and calves on approximately 82,665 Canadian farms and ranches.
      • Alberta accounts for approximately 42% of this inventory.
    • Farm cash receipts from the sale of cattle and calves in 2013 totalled $6.8 billion, 12.4% of total farm receipts.
    • Canada’s beef and veal exports increased by 2.9% from 2012 to 278,966 tonnes in 2013, valued at $1.33 billion.
    • Exports to the United States, China, Hong Kong, Japan and Mexico.
      • The United States is the major export market for Canadian beef accounting for approximately 71% of exports.
      • In 2013, over 1 million head of cattle were exported to the United States for breeding, feeding and processing with feeder cattle exports making up a larger proportion of the trade.
      • In 2013 feeder cattle exports to the US represented 35% of the live trade, up from 21% in 2012.
  • Pork
    • By 2014, there were 12.745 million hogs on approximately 7,090 farms.
    • Farm cash receipts from the sale of slaughter hogs in 2013 totalled $4.1 billion, 7.5% of total farm receipts.
    • In addition, 735,500 head went to processing facilities in the United States and 4.17 million head of isowean/weaner/feeder hogs went for feeding and finishing on United States farms.
    • Exports to the United States, Japan and China.
      • Exports of pork and pork products to all countries are estimated at $3.2 billion in 2013.
      • Processed pork sales totalled an estimated 71,811 tonnes in 2013 with the United States being the dominant purchaser (44.5%).
  • Lamb and Mutton
    • By 2014, there were 893,000 sheep and lambs on approximately 10,111 farms.
    • Canadian sheep production is mostly located in Ontario, Quebec and Alberta (73%).
    • Farm cash receipts for sheep and lambs in 2013 totalled $117.8 million, 0.2% of total farm receipts.
  • Goat, Rabbit, Horse
    • 225,461 goats on about 5,949 farms in Canada were reported in the 2011 Census of Agriculture, a growth of 27% within the last 5 years.
      • In Canada, the goat industry can be segmented into three distinct sectors: chevon (meat), dairy (milk) and fibre (mohair and cashmere).
  • Bison
    • 125,142 bison on about 1,211 farms in Canada according to the 2011 Census of Agriculture.
    • Bison production is primarily concentrated in the west, with 77% of the herd concentrated in Saskatchewan and Alberta.
    • Exports of bison meat are primarily to the US, but boneless product is also shipped to numerous countries in Europe, most notably France, Switzerland, Germany, and Italy.
  • Venison
    • 52,051 head of Canadian farm raised cervids (deer and elk) on about 952 farms were reported in the 2011 Census of Agriculture, a decrease of 55% within the last 5 years.
    • Elk are primarily farmed in western Canada and red deer in the eastern provinces.
    • Fallow deer, white-tailed deer and other cervid species are found throughout Canada.

With annual shipments worth $22.9 billion in 2013, the red meat industry is the largest sector of the Canadian food manufacturing industry.

  • Canada’s meat processing companies manufacture a wide variety of meat products ranging from fresh and frozen meat to processed, smoked, canned and cooked meats, as well as sausage and deli meats.
  • In addition to its red meat exports, Canada can provide halal-certified, kosher and organic meat and meat products.

This is an update to the previous blog, Canada Proposes Monetary Penalties in Food Safety Enforcement: Give Your Input Until March 22, 2014.

Today, Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) can now issue Administrative Monetary Penalities (AMPs) to businesses that do not meet Canada’s meat safety requirements.

  • The new regulatory amendment expands Administrative Monetary Penalities (AMPs) to the Meat Inspection Act and the Meat Inspection Regulations, 1990.
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Inspector / Inspecteur de l'Agence canadienne d’inspection des aliments. Image extracted from video above / Image extraite de la vidéo ci-dessus.
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Inspector / Inspecteur de l’Agence canadienne d’inspection des aliments. Image extracted from video above / Image extraite de la vidéo ci-dessus.

NEWS RELEASE

Harper Government Strengthens Food Safety Enforcement

Introduces monetary penalties for non-compliance with meat safety requirements

July 16, 2014 – Ottawa, ON – Canadian Food Inspection Agency

Today, the Government of Canada is further strengthening Canada’s food safety system by allowing the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) to issue monetary penalties to businesses that do not meet Canada’s meat safety requirements. The new regulatory amendment expands Administrative Monetary Penalities (AMPs) to the Meat Inspection Act and the Meat Inspection Regulations, 1990.

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Community Frugal Crowd Health & Wellness Videos

20 Key Accomplishments to Protect the Health and Safety of Canadians: Health Canada’s Review of 2013

This video presents “Minister’s Year End Video Message.”

  • “The Holidays give us a unique opportunity to reflect on the year that has passed, make memories with friends and family and celebrate the hope that a new year brings.”

The Health Minister of Canada listed, below, 20 key accomplishments in protecting the health and safety of Canadians in 2013.

Health Canada’s Telephone Numbers for Public Enquiries:

  • (613) 957-2991 or
  • Toll free at 1-866 225-0709.

NEWS RELEASE

Health Canada

A Year in Review Steps taken to protect the Health and Safety of Canadians

December 23, 2013

OTTAWA – Today, Health Minister Rona Ambrose highlighted the Government’s key accomplishments in protecting the health and safety of Canadians in 2013.

“Our Government made important headway in the areas of innovation, patient safety, and the tabling of effective legislation for the benefit of all Canadians,” said Minister Ambrose. “We have a lot to be proud of in Canada and we will continue to make concrete investments and take action to protect our health and safety.”

Minister Ambrose identified some of the notable achievements of the Harper Government that included: