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Toronto Ward Boundary Review: Your Input Via a Survey & Public Consultation Meetings in Fall 2015

This silent video presents Toronto City Growth 1880 – 2020.

This is an update to the previous blog, You’re Invited: Toronto Ward Boundary Review’s Public Meetings Jan.7, 8, and 10 + Online Survey (Round One).

The Toronto Ward Boundary Review (TWBR) Options Report was recently released this August, outlining five options for new ward boundaries for Toronto.

The Toronto Ward Boundary Review is looking at the size and shape of Toronto’s wards. The Review is being done to ensure each person in Toronto is fairly represented at City Council. A key focus of the Toronto Ward Boundary Review is making sure the number of people in each ward is similar to other wards in the city. This is the most important component of effective representation.  The Review will also look at communities of interest and neighbourhoods within the city. Ward boundaries should not split up well-established communities. Other factors such as a ward’s history and physical or natural features will also be considered as part of the review.  Read our FAQ

The study is being done by an independent team of consultants who are responsible for making sure the process is not influenced by political interests.

http://www.drawthelines.ca/overview/

Reasons for the Review include:

Current Ward Boundaries: 44 Wards; Current average population is 61,000
Current Ward Boundaries: 44 Wards; Current average population is 61,000
  • Currently, in the City of Toronto there is a wide range in the number of people in each ward.
  • Due to factors like population growth and new construction, some of the city’s wards are 30 percent to 45 percent above the average population – 61,000.
  • As a result, the vote of one person does not have the same value or weight as that of the next person.
  • Ward boundary reviews are complex, costly and include extensive public involvement. Municipalities cannot conduct reviews for every election. The TWBR’s goal is to create a ward system that will last for the next four elections – 2018, 2022, 2026 and 2030. To achieve this, the ‘target year’ for effective representation is set at 2026.

The design of the following five options incorporates input received during round one of the TWBR’s civic engagement and public consultation process:

  • Option 1: Minimal Change – Average ward size is 61,000
Option 1: Minimal Change
Option 1: Minimal Change
  • Option 2: 44 Wards – Average ward population size increases to 70,000
Option 2: 44 Wards
Option 2: 44 Wards
  • Option 3: Small Wards – 50,000 Population
Option 3: Small Wards - 50,000 Population
Option 3: Small Wards – 50,000 Population
  • Option 4: Large Wards – 75,000 Population
Option 4: Large Wards - 75,000 Population
Option 4: Large Wards – 75,000 Population
  • Option 5: Natural/ Physical Boundaries
Option 5: Natural/ Physical Boundaries
Option 5: Natural/ Physical Boundaries

The following timeline of the Toronto Ward Boundary Review is based on a 5-step process:

  1. Background Research (June 2014 – November 2014)
  2. Civic Engagement & Public Consultation on Current Ward Boundaries – Round 1 (July 2014 – February 2015)
  3. Development of Ward Boundary Options (March 2015 – July 2015)
  4. Civic Engagement & Public Consultation on Ward Boundary Options – Round 2 (August 2015 – November 2015)
  5. Final Report with Recommendations to Council (May 2016)

Round Two is focused on collecting feedback on 5 options for new ward boundaries in Toronto. There are two ways to provide feedback:

  1. Complete a Survey. The survey can be completed online or in hard-copy format at http://www.drawthelines.ca/completesurvey
  2. Attend a Public Meeting. The schedule and info about the twelve public meetings to take place across the city this fall, starting September 16, are available at http://www.drawthelines.ca/publicmeetingdates/ .

Also, the Options Report (August 11, 2015) – pdf, Round One Report – pdf, and Backgroung Research Report – pdf are all available at http://www.drawthelines.ca/reports/ .

Furthermore, you will find the Consultation Guide + Survey for both Round One and Round Two at http://www.drawthelines.ca/guide/ .

Finally, the presentations at the public meeting of Round One and the Executive Committee of the City of Toronto are located at http://www.drawthelines.ca/presentations/ .

NEWS RELEASE
11-Aug-2015

Options for Toronto ward boundaries released today along with invitation for public input

The Toronto Ward Boundary Review (TWBR) Options Report was released today, outlining five options for new ward boundaries for Toronto. The design of the options incorporates input received during round one of the TWBR’s civic engagement and public consultation process. All of the options meet the required criteria for a new ward boundary system.

The purpose of the report is to present options for new ward boundaries for the City of Toronto and receive input from residents, stakeholders and members of Council.

There are two ways to provide input:
1. Complete a survey: The survey can be completed online or in hard-copy format.
2. Attend a public meeting: Twelve public meetings will take place across the city this fall, starting September 16.

The Options Report, as well as information about the survey and the public meetings, can be obtained at drawthelines.ca.

The Options Report and survey are available upon request in the following languages besides English: Chinese (Simple and Traditional versions), Farsi, French, Italian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Tagalog, Tamil and Urdu.

Round two of the TWBR civic engagement and public consultation process is now underway. Input on the options will inform the Final Ward Boundary Review Report, which will include a recommended option and will be presented to the Executive Committee and City Council in May 2016.

About the Toronto Ward Boundary Review
The Toronto Ward Boundary Review is looking at the size and shape of Toronto’s wards in order to ensure that each person in Toronto is fairly represented at City Council.

Toronto’s significant growth has resulted in wards with populations above or below the current average of 61,000, with some wards 30 to 50 per cent above the average. The goal of the Review is to ensure that the population in every ward is similar in size throughout the city.

The City of Toronto has oversight of the Toronto Ward Boundary Review. The study is being done by an independent team of consultants responsible for making sure the process is objective.


The following silent video presents Toronto future skyline 3D model:

Blue = under construction
Yellow = in sales
Red = proposed

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